Seattle CARES Mentoring Movement

Seattle Rising Group Mentor Facilitator

Job Description

Position: Seattle Rising Mentor Facilitator

The Seattle CARES Mentoring Movement Rising, a program of the National CARES Mentoring Movement, is currently hiring a part-time group facilitator. The facilitator works with volunteer mentors to conduct Wellness Mentoring Circles (WMC) with students in a middle school setting. The group mentoring sessions, which are for males only, are led by two facilitators. This is an annual contract position.

Facilitators will provide support, tracking, and implementation of The Rising program in 2 schools in Seattle. Lead and facilitate 2 weekly Rising groups during the school-day, utilizing the A New Way Forward Curriculum, participate in weekly team development meetings based on the curriculum.

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The Rising: Elevating Education, Expectations and Self-Esteem

The Rising is an innovative curriculum-based group mentoring initiative that is underway in two Seattle middle schools: Denny International and Meany. The program targets 6th graders and works to create self-esteem and the critical thinking skills they need to succeed. Developed by the National CARES Mentoring Movement, The Rising was piloted in Chicago, Detroit and South Florida where it met with great success.

In Seattle, students meet weekly at their middle school in Wellness Mentoring Circles, facilitated by Seattle CARES-trained mentors and professionals. Community partners are brought in to offer wrap-around services for both children and their families. In 2018, King County’s Best Starts for Kids program awarded a three-year $300,000 grant to Seattle CARES to launch The Rising, and we hope to expand the program in 2019.

Since The Rising was launched nationwide in 2012, data have shown that young people who participate have made statistically significant gains in social skills and engage more in school. Youth were also shown to have more positive feelings about themselves and more hope for the future.

Read more about The Rising (PDF)

Download The Rising Trifold Brochure (PDF)

Mentor Spotlight: Marvin Chapman

Last January, Seattle CARES launched the Our Best: Black Male Achievement Mentoring Campaign at a standing-room-only event at Seattle Central College’s Broadway Performance Hall. A few day’s earlier, SCC student Marvin Chapman saw the event flyer and was intrigued. He attended the launch and signed up to become one of the program’s very first mentors.

“I knew I was going to get involved with mentoring when I showed up that night,” said Chapman. “I was tired of hearing and talking about the problem. I wanted to be part of the solution.”

As a mentor assigned to M.U.S.T., one of our partner agencies, Chapman has experienced both the challenges and the rewards of mentoring. “There are lots of different situations out there that feel like a crisis to a young person,” he said. “You have to be able to stay calm and hear what they are saying. For me, one of the most rewarding things is seeing young guys navigate tough times. It’s great when you hear them say or do things they learned from you.”

Chapman did not have a mentor growing up, but he did learn positive behaviors from adults around him. Currently a computer science major, he hopes to earn enough money in his career so he can dedicate his energy to improving his community.

“I am a mentor because I want to do what I can to change the false narrative surrounding the black community,” said Chapman. “I feel as though the media perpetuates negative stereotypes while mass incarceration is removing strong male role models from our community. This causes youth to accept the images they see in the media as true and to act in certain ways.”

For Seattle CARES Executive Director Don Chapman, Marvin’s recruitment at the launch event was a touch of serendipity. “It’s fitting that the place where we held the launch event attracted one of its own students to get involved,” said Cameron. “Here is a young man attending that same college who wanted to become a mentor and he did — and a really good one at that!”